SACF Events | NorthWest Arkansas Community College

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SACF EVENT SCHEDULE

art from festival

 

Time Event Location
Monday, March 2
All day CUBEMUSIC Burns Hall 1106
All day Sun Boxes North lawn of Student Center
9:00am -10:15am Will Predictive Policing Reduce Crime or Attack Your Rights? White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
10:30am -11:45am The Human Library Project Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
10:30am -11:45am Drop-in Artmaking with Artist Edra Soto Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
12:00pm -1:15pm The Crossroads—Performance by LatinX Theatre Project White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
1:30pm - 2:45 p.m Mindfulness with Sun Boxes
The Human Library Project
North lawn of Student Center
Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
3:00pm - 4:15pm The Future of Title IX and Sexual Violence White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
4:30pm - 5:45pm SPRING: Sound & Silence—Music Performance White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
6:00pm Boy Erased: Film Screening  Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
Tuesday, March 3
All day CUBEMUSIC Burns Hall 1106
All day Sun Boxes North lawn of Student Center
9:00am - 10:15am Making the Invisible Visible White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
10:30am - 11:45am Seeing the Hidden Labor In the Food Chain Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
12:00pm - 1:15pm Spoken Word—Poetry Performance White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
1:30pm - 2:45pm A 360 degree view of Monarch Butterflies Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
2:00pm - 7:00pm Workforce Career Fair Peterson Auditorium, Shewmaker Center for Global Business Development
3:00pm - 6:30pm Ladybug Cathedral—Music Performance White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
7:00pm The Other 21c Museum Hotel, Downtown Bentonville
Wednesday, March 4
All day CUBEMUSIC Burns Hall 1106
All day Sun Boxes North lawn of Student Center
9:00am - 10:15am Situational Awareness and Safety in the 21st Century: A Scavenger Hunt Shewmaker Center for Workforce Technologies  B-103
10:30am - 11:45am Rock Van Winkle: Indispensable Slave and Freedman of Frontier Arkansas Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
12:00pm - 1:15pm Learning to See with Garrard Conley: Radical Compassion in a Complicated South White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030
1:30pm - 2:45pm "Vex"ing Visions of Play in our Robotic Futures Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
3:00pm - 5:45pm I'm Not There: Film Screening and Discussion White Auditorium
7:00pm - 8:00pm Indigenous Stories: Working as a Native Artist Modern Gallery, Crystal Bridges, Downtown Bentonville
Thursday, March 5
9:00am - 1:00 pm Creating a Hand-on Vision for Durable Change in 2020 IDL, Outdoor Fabrication Space and Construction Lab
9:00am - 10:15am Book Club Meeting and Discussion Group for Boy Erased Becky Paneitz Student Center 108 and Washington County Location 210
10:30am - 11:45am Narrating a Native American Life White Auditorium
12:00pm - 1:15pm The Role of the Media in the Presidential Election of 2020 White Auditorium
1:30pm - 2:45pm Creative Visions: Open Mic Reading Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
3:00pm - 4:15pm Vision and Responsibility: Responding to Racist Imagery in American Culture and Art White Auditorium
4:30pm - 5:45pm Bridging the Partisan Divide Becky Paneitz Student Center 108
6:30pm - 9:30pm City Sessions Concert: Durand Jones & the Indications Meteor Guitar Gallery, Downtown Bentonville

Monday, March 2, at a glance:

Monday, March 2
Tuesday, March 3
Wednesday,
March 4

CUBEMUSIC

All day

Burns Hall 1106

CUBEMUSIC is an installation by artist Craig Colorusso that incorporates sound, light, and sculpture. The installation includes six 48” x 48” cubes constructed of aluminum. Each cube has a series of different geometric shapes cut out of the sides. From within each cube emanates a different lighting pattern from three sources as well as a different four-note chord swelling in volume. Together the chords create a thick and dense web of sound that constantly changes. The sounds of CUBEMUSIC engulf the listener. The lights glow and decay in varying patterns through the geometric shapes casting shadows all over the room. The entire space becomes CUBEMUSIC, a throbbing, pulsing environment for one to enter and leave at will.

cube music installaton

Monday, March 2
Tuesday, March 3
Wednesday, March 4

Sun Boxes

All day

Lawn North of Becky Paneitz Student Center

Sun Boxes is a sound installation created by artist Craig Colorusso comprised of twenty speakers operating independently, each powered by the sun via solar panels. There is a different loop set to play a guitar note in each box continuously. These guitar notes collectively make a Bb chord. Because the loops are different in length, once the piece begins they continually overlap and the piece slowly evolves over time. The sounds of Sun Boxes have been described as both soothing and energizing.

sun boxes on beach

Monday, March 2

Will Predictive Policing Reduce Crime or Attack Your Rights

9:00 am - 10:15 am

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

In 1956, Author Philip K. Dick wrote a short story titled “The Minority Report” about the pitfalls of foreseeing crime and stopping it before it occurred. Like most science fiction, the story was ahead of its time. At the time, it was conceived as entertaining but nowhere near any future reality. However, by 2008, many police departments began to take this concept and utilize it in the form of "Predictive Policing." Statistical and analytical models driven by new data-based technologies began to predict and identify potential criminal activity. Since that time, a wide array of sophisticated surveillance methods have exploded. Cell phones, drones, facial recognition software, automated license-plate readers, GPS, online purchases, surveillance cameras, and even doorbells (to name just a few of the technologies currently available) can and do create enormous data banks of information useful to law enforcement. This information may (and some say already is) also be used by law enforcement to create a surveillance state in which our basic Constitutional rights are violated, especially those contained in the First and Fourth Amendments. It has also been argued that, even if regulated, the unintended consequences of “Predictive Policing” may often outweigh any law enforcement value. In using these new technologies, are we perpetuating a myth of racial neutrality, or are we continuing to target communities of color and further damaging relations between the community and law enforcement?

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Monday, March 2

The Human Library Project

10:30 am - 11:45 am

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108

We all have prejudices, even though we don’t want to admit it. The Human Library Project is an international organization dedicated to increasing awareness of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination and the negative effects on the human race. The project provides an opportunity for individuals to confront their own stereotypes, as well as provide a forum for victims of discrimination to be heard. The Human Library works like a normal library, with the exception that the books are people who have experienced prejudice and discrimination. Books and readers meet face-to-face, engage in conversation, with the goal to learn from each other and inspire change. For more information on the project, visit humanlibrary.org.

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Monday, March 2

Drop-in Artmaking with Artist Edra Soto

10:30 am - 11:45 am

Becky Paneitz Student Center

Visiting artist Edra Soto invites students to take a second look at recyclable bottles. Soto’s piece entitled Open 24 Hours uses clay seashells to adorn discarded glass bottles to reimagine beauty in our daily discarded items. In this drop-in activity, students can take part in beautifying their own bottles as they learn more about State of the Art 2020 artist Edra Soto. Finished artworks may be included in Soto’s installation at the Momentary. There will be an opportunity to work with the artist and learn about her featured piece at the Momentary.

 

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Monday, March 2

The Crossroads - Performance by LatinX Theatre Project

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

The Crossroads tells the migration story of a young couple from Mexico who try to make a new life for themselves in America, but begin to see their buried passions and connections to generational stories, come alive again in their daughter.

LatinX Theatre Project (LXTP) is a socially engaged theatre group of professionals and young artists-in-training that is committed to continuing an inclusive conversation about community identity through its devised theatre performances. The content of LXTP’s work not only includes original dialogue, movement, music, poetry, and rap; but also brings a focus to the authentic representation of Latinx voices in the arts and community. In its fourth year, the project continues to develop new performances for the community and educational pieces for schools in the Northwest Arkansas region.  LXTP is unique in the composition of its artistic ensemble, and its distinctive approach to creating work that can be experienced outside of the traditional theatre venue suited to collaborate with multidisciplinary cultural, community, and educational organizations across the region.

theater group

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Monday, March 2

Mindfulness with Sun Boxes

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Lawn North of Becky Paneitz Student Center

Craig Colorusso’s solar-powered Sun Boxes produce an other-worldly soundscape as they hum with a calming array of guitar tones. This installation—which has traveled to over thirty states and fifty cities--invites the audience to slow down and observe, creating an ideal atmosphere to tune into ourselves and our surroundings. All are invited to join artist Craig Colorusso, his Sun Boxes, and yoga teacher Rachel Ackerman on a guided mindfulness journey.

artist meditating with sun boxes

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Monday, March 2

The Future of Title IX and Sexual Violence

3:00 pm - 4:15 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

Join us for the documentary film Title IX that describes the history of this very important and life-altering legislation that attempted to address the inequality of education between men and women and has evolved into a standard-bearer for those who are trying to change the disadvantages women and men have suffered in our society for generations.  Afterwards, a short discussion will take place talking about where we stand now with respect to the ability of individuals to stand up and defeat discrimination and sexual harassment wherever and whenever it arises.  The discussion will be led by NWACC faculty Janet Dodd and participants will include NWACC Dean of Students Dale Montgomery, NWACC Title IX Coordinator Teresa Taylor, and NWACC Director of Student Conduct Ryan Drake.

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Monday, March 2

SPRING: Sound & Silence - Music Performance

4:30 pm - 5:45 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

NWACC Department of Music presents SPRING: Sound & Silence. This performance explores various timbre of sound - human voice, woodwind, keyboard, string instruments, and even ambient noise. The program includes works by variety of composers from different eras, such as Antonio Vivaldi, Franz Schubert, and John Cage.

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Monday, March 2

Boy Erased: Film Screening

6:00 pm

Becky Paneitz Student Center, 108

Boy Erased tells the courageous story of Jared Eamons, the son of a Baptist pastor in a small American town, who must overcome the fallout of being outed to his parents. His parents struggle with reconciling their love for their son with their beliefs. Fearing a loss of family, friends, and community, Jared is pressured into attending a conversion therapy program. While there, Jared comes into conflict with its leader and begins his journey to finding his own voice and accepting his true self. Based on the memoir by Garrard Conley, who grew up in Arkansas, the award-winning movie features performances by Nicole Kidman, Russell Crowe, Lucas Hedges, and Joel Edgerton.

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Tuesday, March 3, at a glance:

Tuesday, March 3

Making the Invisible Visible

9:00 am - 10:15 am

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

Our goal is to identify those who are the least visible people on campus and in our community, and highlight the vital work they do. There are so many people behind the scenes of everyday operations that receive little to no recognition—e.g. custodial & grounds staff, IT, etc. All the people whose work can be seen everywhere but who are often overlooked—why is it that we don't esteem the work that these people do for us, and how can we work to change our perception?

Members of the Honors Students Association want to help others look around and see people, their value, and their work. They will explore why some people fall to the wayside and their contributions to society are deemed "less important" when our ability to function is reliant on them.

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Tuesday, March 3

Spoken Word - Poetry Performance

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

Four local poets led by Noelia Cerna, along with some NWACC poetry students, will explore the theme of 20/20 Vision using spoken word poetry, an engaging, dynamic, performance-based art.

Noelia Cerna is a Latina poet and writer based in Fayetteville. She is a first generation immigrant from Costa Rica and received her Bachelor’s Degree in English from Westminster College in Missouri. Her current book projects include a full-length manuscript of poems discussing her experiences as a first generation immigrant and a book of essays about the Arkansas prison system. Noelia is a reader for Tinderbox Poetry Journal and a poetry mentor for Pen America’s Prison Writing Mentorship program. Her poems have recently appeared in audio form in Terse Journal and are forthcoming in the North Meridian Review.

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Tuesday, March 3

Seeing the Hidden Labor in the Food Chain

10:30 am - 11:45 am

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108

The Director of Brightwater, Marshall Shafkowitz, discusses the hidden cost of labor in the food supply with United Farmworker Vice President Erika Navarrete.

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Tuesday, March 3

A 360 Degree View of Monarch Butterflies

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108

Leslie Fowler from the Arkansas Monarch Conservation Partnership and Laurie Scott will discuss the importance of pollinators, including the monarch butterfly, and the ways that partnerships can serve large communities in multiple ways. We will also examine the NWACC Butterfly Garden completed by Service Learning and examine the on-campus partnerships that made this vision possible. This quick lecture will be followed by an opportunity to make "Seed Bombs" and possibly take groups out to the Outdoor Living Laboratory to "bomb" the bio-swale. Join Leslie and Laurie to learn the "all hands on deck" approach to monarch and pollinator conservation!

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Tuesday, March 3

Workforce Career Fair

2:00 pm - 7:00 pm

Peterson Auditorium, Shewmaker Center for Global Business Development

 

Visit Peterson Auditorium to network with area employers to learn about local job opportunities, trends and services.

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Tuesday, March 3

Ladybug Cathedral - Music Performance

3:00 pm - 6:30 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1020

Drop by for a musical collaboration between artist Craig Colorusso and other musicians as they perform Colorusso’s piece Ladybug Cathedral. Of this piece, Colorusso writes, “When I was kid, I remember humming while my mother vacuumed. It felt different than singing along to the radio, and looking back, I think I can say with certainty it was a different experience. My whole body vibrated with the humming and the vacuum. It was the first time I was able to listen to music as a full body experience. I’m interested in making long forms of music slow and deliberate. The sweeping sounds to last forever.  No beginning, no end, just audio. The participant is free to come and go as they please. The only requirement is to just listen and plug in to the sound. My goal is to create music for others to vibrate in.” This performance includes an extended reed section led by Manchusa Loungsangroong in collaboration with University of Arkansas clarinet studio. 

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Tuesday, March 3

The Other

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

21c Museum Hotel, Downtown Bentonville

What is it to be human today? In her talk Anita Groener will touch on how we - in our minds and through individual and collective behavior create  'the other’ seen in light of the idea of ‘the narcissism of minor differences’. How does this perception define the world we live in today?. The artist’s work explores the substance of trauma and loss rooted in these questions. Her work takes an anthropological view on how systems, networks and communities come about through human interaction. Focusing on specific current events, their archetypal and psychological resonances, the artist traces urgent connections between people driven from their homes through armed, political, economic or environmental conflict and her own life and family. The deliberately modest means of her work speaks to the fragility of life and society that refugee crises expose. Her art implicates herself and us, asking questions about the ethics of witnessing and aesthetic response

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Wednesday, March 4, at a glance:

Wednesday, March 4

Situational Awareness and Safety in the 21st Century: A Scavenger Hunt

9:00 am - 10:15 am

Shewmaker for Center for Workforce Technologies/ Workforce Development B103

As our world and local community changes, so too do needs for situational awareness and safety. In order to be compassionate, civically minded community members, we need to be educated on how best to help ourselves and others, as well as on what we can do to mitigate risk.

This self-paced, escape room, scavenger-hunt formatted game involves various spots on campus that should invoke users’ “situational awareness and safety” knowledge that but most users/students/staff do not recognize as such. The game makes learning about safety and situational awareness (everything from active shooter incidents to temperature awareness) fun, self-paced and contextual.

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Wednesday, March 4 

Rock Van Winkle: Indispensable Slave and Freedman of Frontier Arkansast

10:30 am - 11:45 am

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108

Chris Huggard and Jerry Moore discusses the exemplary story of a former slave and a successful African American businessman in post-Civil War Arkansas.

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Wednesday, March 4 

Learning to See with Garrard Conley: Radical Compassion in a Complicated South

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

Garrard Conley shares stories from his memoir, Boy Erased, about growing up in a fundamentalist household and attending a conversion therapy program. While there, Jared comes into conflict with its leaders and begins his journey to finding his own voice and accepting his true self. After over a decade of recovery, he now shares some of his insights on human nature.

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Wednesday, March 4 

"Vex"ing Visions of Play in our Robotic Futures

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108

For good or bad, we find ourselves in the fourth industrial revolution. Projections suggest that 50 percent of the jobs done manually will be automated by 2025. How do we embrace this vision and still maintain our values of community development through affordable, accessible, quality education/training? This event addresses this basic question and features Vex Robots and, if good weather, "chalk bots," for which students can do interactive coding activities to program the robots and do tricks, bot battles, and obstacle courses. Participants receive prizes for answering questions about automation, the 4th industrial revolution, and all things robotics.

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Wednesday, March 4 

I'm Not There: Film Screening and Discussion

3:00 pm - 5:45 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

This event includes a film showing of I'm Not There and a discussion of the career, life, celebrity and cultural impact of Bob Dylan. I'm Not There weaves together six actors embodying different aspects of the musician's life and work (like Christian Bale, Cate Blanchett, or Health Ledger). The film and Bob Dylan address many issues of the role of vision and spectacle within modern society as it plays out in celebrity culture, masculinity, rock music, queerness, class, and American folklore. The event concludes with a facilitated discussion about the film and Dylan by Sean Latham, Walter Endowed Chair of English and Director of the Institute for Bob Dylan Studies of Tulsa University.

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Wednesday, March 4 

Indigenous Stories: Working as a Native Artist

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Modern Gallery at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Join Native American storyteller Robert Lewis for an evening of storytelling and discussion. Robert Lewis is an award-winning storyteller, author, and artist of Cherokee, Navaho, and Apache descent. Lewis works for the Cherokee Nation as a school and community specialist and conducts outreach classes and services in art, culture, and storytelling.

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Thursday, March 5, at a glance:

Thursday, March 5

Creating a Hands-On Vision for Durable Change in 2020

9:00 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Outdoor Fabrication Space and Construction Lab, Integrated Design Lab

In today's disposable and digitized culture, people still need to experience the democratizing and community-sustaining craft of durable design that comes from using one's hands. Likewise, we could all learn from the messy but equalizing process of contributing to a group-designed, group-created sculpture. This event enables individual students and classes to participate democratically in the building of a collective sculpture in the outdoor fabrication space of the IDL supervised by 3D and Construction Faculty.

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Thursday, March 5

Book Club Meeting and Discussion Group for Boy Erased

9:00 am - 10:15 am

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108 AND NWACC Washington County 210, 6101 Watkins Avenue, Springdale

The NWACC Book Club hosts a series of facilitated discussions of Garrard Conley’s book Boy Erased: A Memoir of Identity, Faith, and Family (2017, Riverhead Books). These discussions, composed of 10-15 people and led by a facilitator who has studied the book, examine the biography of a gay journalist and activist growing up the son of an Arkansas evangelical preacher, as well as topics that arise from the book like homophobia, gay conversion therapy, queer politics, and rural and urban gay life. NOTE: There are two locations for this event—one at the Bentonville campus and one at the NWACC Washington County, 6101 Watkins Avenue, Springdale.

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Thursday, March 5

Narrating a Native American Life

10:30 am - 11:45 am

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

Robert Lewis, famed Native American storyteller of Cherokee Nation, brings the worlds of different indigenous tribes to life for the audience through his interactive, audience-involved, story-telling. His stories reveal the role of colonialism and Native American life in our modern world, and unravel many of the blind spots in our modern subject positions.

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Thursday, March 5

The Role of the Media in the Presidential Election of 2020

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

White Auditorium, Burns Hall 1030

This panel of media experts examines the perils of the presidential election year and the future of Freedom of the Press in the age of "fake news", international meddling in our elections, the internet, and social media. Bring your questions and points of view for a panel consisting of representatives of the print media, television, radio and online media.

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Thursday, March 5

Creative Visions: Open Mic Reading

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108

Insatiable Ink, the creative writing club at NWACC, hosts a literary reading and open mic on this year’s festival theme of 20/20 Vision.

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Thursday, March 5

Vision and Responsibility: Responding to Racist Imagery in American Culture and Art

3:00 pm - 4:15 pm

White Auditorium

Raven Cook, a museum educator and an African American historian, explores the difficult topic of how American society has historically consumed racist imagery against Black Americans in art and popular culture.

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Thursday, March 5

Bridging the Partisan Divide

4:30 pm - 5:45 pm

Becky Paneitz Student Center 108

NWACC math professor, Nathan Crowder, hosts a documentary film and a workshop that addresses increased partisanship, tribalism, and vitriol in public life. The short documentary portrays the results of a workshop delivered by Better Angels, a group working to end toxic partisanship; the workshop provides the tools to listen and have fruitful conversations with those which you disagree.

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Thursday, March 5

City Sessions Concert: Durand Jones & the Indications

6:30 pm - 9:30 pm

Meteor Guitar Gallery, Downtown Bentonville

NOTE: This is a ticketed event.  NWACC's SACF has 100 free tickets available.  Please email sacf@nwacc.edu if you would like to reserve tickets.

Durand Jones & the Indications aren’t looking backwards. Helmed by foil vocalists in Durand Jones and drummer Aaron Frazer, the Indications conjure the dynamism of Jackie Wilson, Curtis Mayfield, and The Impressions. Though their aesthetic is steeped in the golden dreaminess of early ‘70s soul, the Indications are planted firmly in the present, with the urgency of this moment in time.

Their most recent album, American Love Call, is a sprawling and limitless equation. Fleshed out by the elegance of strings, a chorus of backing vocals, and an ambition to prove and push themselves, the split leads between Jones’ husky howl and Frazer’s dulcet falsetto lend a dynamic punch to the group’s timeless sound.

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