Geography

Physical Geography:  An introductory survey of the various components of the physical environment and the basic interrelationships among them. Topics of study include movements of the earth and seasonal change, interpretation of maps, the elements of weather and climate, and the effects of physical processes upon various types of  regions. Emphasis is on developing a broad perspective of the natural world.

Human Geography: An introductory study of the cultural factors that make up Human Geography and their relevance in today’s world. From the viewpoint of spatial distributions, students gain a perspective on different aspects such as population growth, language, religion, political systems and economic development. Students acquire a global perspective by comparing selected countries and seeing the impact of change on their cultural landscapes.

World Regional Geography: This course surveys the major geographic regions of the world, considering the differences that set one realm apart from another environmentally, socially, politically, and economically. The meaning of "development" is considered and used in comparing the various regions in the context of diversity and globalization. A sampling of regions studied includes North America, Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Southwest Asia, Europe, the Russian Domain, and Central and East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia.

Philosophy and Religion

 Introduction to Philosophy:  A survey of basic philosophical topics such as the nature of the human mind, freedom of will and standards of right and wrong. Representative philosophical problems will be proposed and examined. (Cross referenced-Humanities.)

Introduction to Philosophy (HONORS): This course is open to students who would enjoy reading, understanding, analyzing, discussing and critically evaluating the actual writings of classical as well as contemporary philosophers. Students will examine philosophical topics such as whether or not God exists, whether or not we have souls, whether or not we survive death, whether or not our minds are immaterial, whether or not we have free will, whether or not there are moral truths and whether or not we have knowledge. Students will read from primary source materials by such authors as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Hume, and Kant. See the Honors Program section in this catalog for more information.

World Religions: An examination of different religious beliefs, with an emphasis on Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism.

World Religions (HONORS): A nonsectarian examination of the major living religions of the world, with an emphasis on Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students research and discuss the historical evolution of religions as well as fundamental doctrines, scriptures, beliefs, practices, and institutions. Thematic topics vary, but may include origin theories, mythology, religion and politics, interpretation of religious scripture, the role of gender, tribal religion, religious tolerance, modern challenges to religion.

Introduction to Ethics: An examination of the basic concepts of ethics including moral relativism vs. objectives, moral realism, Kantian ethics, virtue ethics, individual liberty vs. paternalism, and the application of theory to issues such as abortion, capital punishment, euthanasia, etc.

Introduction to Logic: An introduction to the process and discipline of logical thought. Includes both traditional and modern methods of deductive and inductive inference.

Political Science

American National Government: The organization, functions, institutions, and problems of the federal government will be studied including the United States Constitution, Congress, the Presidency and federal bureaucracy, and the judicial system. Additional study will be given to political parties, public opinion, interest groups, voting and elections, Supreme Court decisions, and other political aspects and activities of government.

American National Government (HONORS): The organization, functions, institutions, and problems of the federal government will be studied including the United States Constitution, Congress, the Presidency and federal bureaucracy, and the judicial system. Additional study will be given to political parties, public opinion, interest groups, voting and elections, Supreme Court decisions, and other political aspects and activities of government.

State and Local Government: The organization and functions of state and local governments will be studied with focus on state constitution, and the executive, legislative, and executive branches. Other aspects of government and politics including political parties, interest groups, voting and elections will also be studied. Attention and study will also be given to Arkansas government, its institutions, and politics.

Introduction to International Relations: Analysis of the nature of foreign relations with special emphasis given to contemporary problems such as the international community, balance of power, international conflict and cooperation.

Political Science Internship: Student will work in internship positions that relate to government and/or politics. They will perform tasks as assigned by the organization for which they are interning. These can include office work, dealing with constituents, telephone contacts, research, and other tasks needed by the organization. Credit hours vary (1-3 credit hours) depending on the amount of time the student works in the internship position.

 

American History, Arkansas History, US and Vietnam, History of the American West

History of the American People to 1877: Exploration of aspects in American history beginning with European backgrounds; discovery and settlement; concluding with the Civil War and Reconstruction. This survey encompasses the constitutional, political, social and economic development of the United States prior to 1877.

History of the American People to 1877 (HONORS): This course is a survey of the history of the region that would become the United States from the pre-Columbian era through the end of reconstruction following the Civil War. The course provides an overview of important political, social, religious, constitutional and economic developments of the period. Specific themes will vary by instructor.  Please refer to the NWACC Honors Program section in the current catalog for more information.

History of the American People, Since 1877: Exploration of aspects in American history from Reconstruction to the second half of the Twentieth Century. This survey encompasses the constitutional, political, social and economic development of the United States since 1877. Particular emphasis will be placed on the rise of the United States as an industrial and world power.

History of the American People, Since 1877 (HONORS): Explores the history of American life including constitutional, political, social, intellectual and economic development from Reconstruction to the present. Specific themes will vary by instructor. Please refer to the NWACC Honors Program section in the current catalog for more information.

History of Arkansas: A presentation of the political, economic, social and cultural development of Arkansas from the arrival of the Native American to the present.

The United States and Vietnam: A survey of the Vietnam War with emphasis on the role played by the United States, as well as an analysis of its impact on American politics and society.

History of the American West, Travel (HONORS): The history of the American West from the earliest Native American civilizations to the present day. Specific course content will vary by term. The travel component of the course will reflect and augment course content with a varied itinerary as needed. Possible course topics include: a historiography of the nature and definition of the West, Native American civilizations, exploration and expansion, race relations and conflict between and among inhabitants, social and economic development of the region, and conservation and recreation in the region.

World Civilization

 
World Civilizations to 1500 - This survey of World Civilizations offers students a global and comparative perspective on the emergence and development of civilizations to 1500.

World Civilizations to 1500 (HONORS): This survey of World Civilizations offers students a global and comparative perspective on the emergence and development of civilizations to 1500.

World Civilizations Since 1500: This survey of World Civilizations offers students a global and comparative perspective on the development of civilization since 1500.

World Civilizations Since 1500 (HONORS): This survey of World Civilizations offers students a global and comparative perspective on the development of civilization since 1500.

*From time to time, the various departments will offer SPECIAL TOPICS courses and INDEPENDENT STUDY courses.